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June 2021

The Clements Bookworm: Author Conversation with Crystal Lynn Webster, “African American Children in the Antebellum North”

June 18 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am

In her new book “Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood,” Crystal Lynn Webster argues that young African Americans were frequently left outside the 19th century's emerging constructions of both race and childhood. Drawing evidence from the urban centers of the Antebellum North, Webster's innovative research yields a powerful new history of African American childhood before the Civil War, showing that Black children nevertheless carved out physical and social space for play, for learning, and for their own aspirations. Webster joins us in conversation with Clements Library Director Paul Erickson. This episode of the Bookworm coincides with the celebration of Juneteenth and a growing national recognition of understudied histories and experiences of African Americans in the past.

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July 2021

The Clements Bookworm: Author Conversation with Karen Marrero, “Detroit’s Hidden Channels”

July 16 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Bookshelves at the Clements

The Clements Bookworm is a webinar series in which panelists discuss history topics. In this episode, past Clements fellow and Wayne State University professor Karen Marrero joins us to discuss her new book "Detroit’s Hidden Channels: The Power of French-Indigenous Families in the Eighteenth Century" (Michigan State University Press & University of Manitoba Press, 2020). This episode of the Bookworm is generously sponsored by Douglas Johnson.

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August 2021

The Clements Bookworm: Michilimackinac, “Where archaeology and history meet”

August 20 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am

The Clements Bookworm is a webinar series in which panelists discuss history topics. In this episode, Lynn Evans, archaeologist at Mackinac State Historic Parks, will discuss how archaeology and history are used to gain a more complete picture of life on the fur trade frontier at Fort Michilimackinac. Built by the French in 1715, acquired by the British in 1761 and demolished by them in 1781, Michilimackinac has been the site of historical and archaeological research since 1959.

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