William L. Clements Library

Upcoming Exhibits and Events

Exhibits:

May 3 - October 25, 2019

Niagara River Watercolor

"Things I Like Most About the Clements Library: Brian Leigh Dunnigan Retrospective"

Exhibit hours are 10:00 am to 4:00 pm Fridays. Learn more about our Current Exhibits.



Events:

All lectures are free and open to the public, but registration is requested. See links below to register.


Lecture – 6:00pm, Thursday, May 23 – Robertson Auditorium at Ross School of Business

S. Max Edelson, “The New Map of Empire: How Britain Imagined America Before Independence”

A Michigan Map Society Lecture

In the eighteenth century, Britain relied on geographic knowledge to reform its American empire. The schemes of colonial development and control that these maps envisioned, Edelson argues, helped provoke the resistance that led to the American Revolution. Lecture presented in collaboration with the Stephen S. Clark Library. Dr. S. Max Edelson is Professor of History at the University of Virginia. His second book, “The New Map of Empire: How Britain Imagined America Before Independence” (Harvard University Press, 2017) was a finalist for the George Washington Book Prize and received the John Lyman Book Award for U.S. Maritime History by the North American Society for Oceanic History. Register online.


Brown Bag – 12:00-1:00pm, Thursday, May 30 – Clements Library

Sarah Swedberg, “The Folly and Madness of War”

In this talk, Dr. Sarah Swedberg will discuss her current research at the Clements Library as recipient of the Howard H. Peckham Fellowship on Revolutionary America. Her project, "The Folly and Madness of War, 1775-1783" focuses on the ways the United States founding generation worried about irrationality as they worked to build a rational state. Attendees are welcome to bring a lunch and eat during the presentation. Register online.


Lecture – 6:00pm, Tuesday, June 4 – Robertson Auditorium at Ross School of Business

Patrick Spero, “Frontier Rebels: The Fight for Independence in the American West, 1765-1776”

Discover the untold Story of the "Black Boys," a rebellion on the American frontier in 1765. Drawing on largely forgotten manuscript sources from across North America, Spero reveals an often-overlooked truth: the West played a crucial role in igniting the flame of American independence. Patrick Spero is a scholar of early American history, specializing in the era of the American Revolution. He is the Librarian and Director of the American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia. Dr. Spero holds a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Register online.


Celebrating Brian L. Dunnigan – Tuesday, June 11

4:30-5:30pm – Special Exhibit Viewing, Clements Library

6:00pm – Reflections & Remarks with Reception to follow, Blau Colloquium at Ross School of Business

Clements Library Associate Director and Curator of Maps Brian Leigh Dunnigan is retiring. Join us as we congratulate him and reflect on his career. The Clements will hold a viewing of Dunnigan's exhibit (4:30-5:30pm) prior to this special event at the Ross School's 5th floor Blau Colloquium, featuring Remarks and a Reception. Register online.


Brown Bag – 12:00-1:00pm, Thursday, August 22 – Clements Library

Madeline L. Zehnder, “Pocket-Sized Nation: Cultures of Portability in America, 1790-1850”

In this Brown Bag lunch talk, Madeline L. Zehnder will discuss her current research at the Clements Library as recipient of the Mary G. Stange Fellowship. A PhD candidate in the University of Virginia's Department of English, Zehnder is working on a dissertation about portable objects in early American literature and material culture. Attendees are welcome to bring a lunch and eat during the presentation. Register online.